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February 11, 2015

Love is in the air at the Button Museum this week! We’re sharing some of our favorite heart buttons on Instagram, and couldn’t resist putting together a collection of some of the flirty, bawdy and just plain naughty buttons designed to, in the words of the button, “feel good all over.”

Valentine's Day Buttons from the Button Museum

Clockwise from top left:

1. “I Feel Good All Over” – 1974 button featuring Air Jamaica’s optimistic slogan, part of a campaign aimed at vacationers looking for a good time. Whether you’re headed to the Caribbean or not, the button seems appropriate for anybody looking for a good time.

2. “Don’t Make Me Blush” – Circa 1970’s or 1980s icebreaker button employing perfect reverse psychology.

3. “Hello Handsome” – 1940’s button featuring a young lady with eyebrows raised, definitely liking the look of whatever “handsome” she’s spotted. This design is from a series of bawdy 6/8″ buttons made for retail.

4. “I Love Me” – Probably 1970s or 1980s import button made for retail, it’s the perfect design for those with healthy self-esteem, or narcissistic tendencies.

5. “You Tickle My Fancy” – Circa 1950’s featuring a bashful dog and flirty message.

6. “Kiss Me, I’m Left-Handed!” – A button after Ned Flanders’ heart, this button features what we assume is an intentionally reversed left-to-right pinback made for left-hander’s convenience.

7. “U and I Make a Good (Pear)” and “You are the Apple of My Eye” – Pair of rebus buttons from the 1930’s making good use of fruit imagery.

8. “Sweet Young Thing” – Circa late-1960’s button ready-made for the flower child.

9. “I Am Too Young to Love” and “My Girl is Very (Fly)” – Buttons produced at the turn of the century by Whitehead and Hoag, shortly after they patented the original pinback button design. These two 6/8″ buttons were most likely premiums given away with gum or cigarettes.

11. “Let’s Lock Loins” – Cheeky 1960’s button made, according to the rimtext, by the “Hip Prod.” company right here in Chicago.

12. “I’m for Sexual Freedom” – Late-1960’s button created by Underground Uplift Unlimited, a head shop in the East Village open from 1967-71.

February 11, 2015

Love is in the air at the Button Museum this week! We’re sharing some of our favorite heart buttons on Instagram, and couldn’t resist putting together a collection of some of the flirty, bawdy and just plain naughty buttons designed to, in the words of the button, “feel good all over.”

Valentine's Day Buttons from the Button Museum

Clockwise from top left:

1. “I Feel Good All Over” – 1974 button featuring Air Jamaica’s optimistic slogan, part of a campaign aimed at vacationers looking for a good time. Whether you’re headed to the Caribbean or not, the button seems appropriate for anybody looking for a good time.

2. “Don’t Make Me Blush” – Circa 1970’s or 1980s icebreaker button employing perfect reverse psychology.

3. “Hello Handsome” – 1940’s button featuring a young lady with eyebrows raised, definitely liking the look of whatever “handsome” she’s spotted. This design is from a series of bawdy 6/8″ buttons made for retail.

4. “I Love Me” – Probably 1970s or 1980s import button made for retail, it’s the perfect design for those with healthy self-esteem, or narcissistic tendencies.

5. “You Tickle My Fancy” – Circa 1950’s featuring a bashful dog and flirty message.

6. “Kiss Me, I’m Left-Handed!” – A button after Ned Flanders’ heart, this button features what we assume is an intentionally reversed left-to-right pinback made for left-hander’s convenience.

7. “U and I Make a Good (Pear)” and “You are the Apple of My Eye” – Pair of rebus buttons from the 1930’s making good use of fruit imagery.

8. “Sweet Young Thing” – Circa late-1960’s button ready-made for the flower child.

9. “I Am Too Young to Love” and “My Girl is Very (Fly)” – Buttons produced at the turn of the century by Whitehead and Hoag, shortly after they patented the original pinback button design. These two 6/8″ buttons were most likely premiums given away with gum or cigarettes.

11. “Let’s Lock Loins” – Cheeky 1960’s button made, according to the rimtext, by the “Hip Prod.” company right here in Chicago.

12. “I’m for Sexual Freedom” – Late-1960’s button created by Underground Uplift Unlimited, a head shop in the East Village open from 1967-71.

January 9, 2015

Braving subzero windchills and foot-high snowdrifts isn’t exactly what most of I would consider a good time, but I hear that there are people who actually enjoy the weather this time of year– some who even look forward to it.  It must be true, because the Button Museum boasts a collection of buttons made by people actually celebrating the winter weather, commemorating winter festivals and events throughout the 20th century.

Winter Buttons from the Button Museum CollectionSurely if you live in one of the more northerly states of the US, you know what you’re getting yourself into for the winder. Long, cold days and longer, colder nights are the norm in places like Duluth, Minnesota and Whitefish, Montana. We assume that creating winter carnivals and such is part of the “grin and bear it” approach of getting through the season.

St. Paul Winter Carnival Buttons

St. Paul Minnesota’s Winter Carnival was founded in 1886 in response to a New York reporter who called the city “another Siberia, unfit for human habitation.” The Button Museum’s examples celebrating the event span half a century, with a grinning carnival king from 1939 (though we could be dressed more warmly for the cold– that crown offer very little insulation), and a bitter battle between Fire and Ice from 1992’s “You’ve Got to Believe”-themed celebration.

Blizzard Souvenir ButtonsAlso part of the Museum’s collection, a button for survivors of the Chicago’s Blizzard of 1979, which blanketed the city with over 16 inches in a single day in January. Not to be outdone by the generation before, the Beavers created the button on the right to commemorate Chicago’s 2011 blizzard, which dumped nearly two feet of snow is just a day and a half.

Whatever your stance on the winter weather, a commemorative button can serve as a happy reminder of good times had, or a nudge to enjoy that summer sun a little more, for Old Man Winter will be back again soon enough.

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